Former Australian Test captain Steve Waugh and other former sporting stars to ride 701km for charity

Former Australian Test captain Steve Waugh and other former sporting stars to ride 701km for charity

Steve Waugh and Adam Goodes

 

We are so excited to be riding with the Steve Waugh Foundation for Rare Diseases. The team at the Steve Waugh Foundation have done an awesome job raising awareness for the cause. Check out the below article featured in The Daily Telegraph yesterday!

 

Stay up to date with The Captains Ride here at OTG News!

 

The Captains Ride – October 29 – Nov 3, 2016.   

 

Ben Horne, The Daily Telegraph

October 18, 2016 12:15am

 

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/sport/cricket/former-australian-test-captain-steve-waugh-and-other-former-sporting-stars-to-ride-701km-for-charity/news-story/2de97721269c87d9dd0aa3a999297fe7

 

Former Australian Test captain Steve Waugh and other former sporting stars to ride 701km for charity

 

Ben Horne, The Daily Telegraph

October 18, 2016 12:15am

 

STEVE Waugh has faced Curtly Ambrose at his peak and the might of India in the subcontinent.

But when it comes to physical and mental ordeals, the former Test captain says the toughest cricket had to offer doesn’t come close.

Later this month Waugh will push himself and a peloton of sporting greats such as Adam Goodes, Matt Hayden and Anna Meares to their absolute limits on the 701km ‘The Captain’s Ride’ cycling event from Mittagong to the 2,200 metre heights of Mt Kosciuszko.

Joining them on this year’s journey to raise money and awareness for children living with rare diseases is the world’s first self-propelled children’s bicycle, an ingenious device programmed to follow Waugh on the ride, and also film every aspect via a 360 degree camera.

Rich in symbolism, Waugh wants this arduous ride to in some way provide an appreciation of the difficulties sick kids suffer every day, and the bike is a way of furthering that powerful message — the idea being the riderless bike is on the road representing the children who can’t be there to pedal themselves.

 

Waugh admits last year’s inaugural ride left him completely shattered both physically and mentally for three months, and warned former teammate Hayden to be prepared for pain.

 

“I’m hoping he’s going to struggle because he always rates himself in the fitness department,” said Waugh.

“Knowing Haydos, he’s trained pretty hard, he’s done a lot of triathlons … but having said that until you go on one of these you’re really not sure what you’re in for because you’re not sure what’s around the next bend.

 

“It’s been very intense. We created this event last year and I certainly was under prepared for it. I want it to mirror in some small way the attitude the kids show each and every day, where they’re up against the odds, and they’re committed and never complain.

 

“But I set the bar too high last year and I nearly paid the price. I took a couple of months to properly recover — it was the most physically and mentally challenging thing I’ve ever done.

 

“I’ve actually been training six days a week this time and I’m probably more committed to this bike challenge than I ever was to playing cricket.”

 

The riderless bike — a kid’s bicycle fitted with an electronic motor and steering system — is built and engineered to follow Waugh on his path.

Children will be able to watch his progress online as if they’re there with him themselves, meanwhile images of their faces will flash up on the i-pad for spectators to understood the meaning of what the bike represents.

Steve Waugh and Adam Goodes

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