The Top 50 Emerging Leaders List of 2015

The Top 50 Emerging Leaders List of 2015

Last night, BRW revealed their annual Top 50 Best Places to Work list for the year. Call it a coincidence or call it the stars aligning, but there happens to be a little bit of crossover with our own list of emerging Australian leaders and some of the companies that were chosen by Fairfax. The message it sends is clear: there are a particular group of people breaking down barriers and building sustainable businesses and organisations. These people will no doubt serve as inspiration for the next generation of dreamers, creators and business builders, and that is something to be truly proud of.

 

In putting together this list, Startup Daily looked at many metrics. Leadership is not just about financial turnover or capital raised for a business, it is not even necessarily about whether you have founded a business. The metrics our teamed looked at when putting this list together include: an individual’s social and industry influence; traction of the company the individual leads or their influence within the organisation they are part of; as well as the size of team they are part of. Only people that operate within a team of five or more employees were eligible to make the list.

 

It is also important to note that this list was about emerging leaders, so everyone in the list has been leading or working within their organisation for less than 10 years.

Unlike other lists that Startup Daily produces, this list is not biased towards technology businesses.

Companies that have an affiliation with Startup Daily by way of sitting on our advisory board were not eligible for the list. This also means our major sponsor for this list, We Love Numbers, and people associated with its current campaign were also not eligible to make the list.

Congratulations to our Top 50 Emerging Leaders for 2015.

 

Our top three spots this year have been taken out by the founders of two high-growth technology companies (One Shift and Canva) and the CEO of an entrepreneurial education company (The Entourage). George, Perkins and Bell all lead teams of 50+ people on a daily basis and are well regarded within their organisations and their industries as effective leaders. Unlike George and Perkins, Bell is not the founder of The Entourage; he is the CEO and has done an outstanding job this year of working alongside Founder and Director of the company Jack Delosa to expand the company’s reach across the Australian market. 

 

One person that would be less known to Startup Daily readers would be the founder of menswear label Barney Cools, Nat Taubman. While Barney Cools is a relatively new brand, most people would already be familiar with its ‘older-brother’ brand Zanerobe, of which Taubman is also Creative Director. In such a short time, not only has he built a huge following for the brands, but he has formed massive partnerships with retail brands across the world including Glue, Urban Outfitters and Nordstrom, all while leading two expanding teams of high-growth fashion brands.

 

What has been particularly interesting about putting this list together is that Startup Daily was able to look beyond companies’ founders and identify individuals within organisations that may be effectively leading teams or departments with great success. For example, Angelo Giuffrida has been one of the youngest CEOs of a company for around two years in Australia and leads a large national team, yet outside his immediate industry, does not usually garner a lot of recognition for his achievements. Another example is Kurt Juson who leads the sales team at Redback Conferencing, a BRW Fast Starter List company. 

 

This list is bought to you by our partners at We Love Numbers, Australia’s number one community for successful entrepreneurs who want to keep on top of their cashflow and business growth.

Visit welovenumbers.community/apply for more information.

To read official article click here: http://www.startupdaily.net/the-emerging-leaders-list-of-2015/

Startup Daily

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